Heavy Coffee Consumption Linked To Earlier Death [Study]

Sorry, caffeine addicts. A new study has found that heavy coffee consumption has been linked to earlier death for those who drink it while they are younger than 55. 

While drinking coffee has been linked to things like lower suicide risk, cancer risk, heart failure rate, stroke rate, and Alzheimer’s risk. However, it appears the substance isn’t all good. 

Researchers from a decades-long study have found that coffee doesn’t have protective benefits, reports CBS News. Instead, the study found that drinking four or more cups of coffee per day could be deadly.

 The number totals to 28 cups of coffee a week, and was linked to a 21 percent increase in death. But the risk increased by 50 percent if the coffee drinker was under 55. That spells trouble for Americans, where the average adult drinks about three cups of coffee per day. Researchers followed 44,000 people between the ages of 20 and 87 years old, between 1971 and 2002. 

The subjects answered health surveys about things like their personal and family medical histories, and lifestyle habits. Those habits included how much coffee they drank. USA Today notes that the study’s second co-author, Xumei Sui, explained that “it seem safe to drink one to three cups of coffee a day.” However, more than that could “endanger health,” according to Sui. The was published online in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings on Thursday.

 While the researchers discovered that there is a link between excessive coffee consumption and a higher death rate for younger people, they aren’t sure exactly why it happens. But Sui explains that the caffeine in coffee can elevate a person’t heart rate, raise blood pressure, and raise blood sugar levels. 

But at the same time, coffee is also an excellent source of antioxidants. But researchers added that people who consumed higher amounts of coffee were also more likely to smoke and also have a lower level of fitness.
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